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A competition for budding snappers

14 Nov
Jaguar, Brazil

Jaguar (Panthera onca), Pantanal, Mato grosso, Brazil © 2002 Staffan Widstrand, All Rights Reserved

Per-Anders Pettersson

© Per-Anders Pettersson

Amazon is a free exhibition, currently being held at the brand new East Wing galleries at Somerset House. Showcasing photography by Sebastião Salgado and Per Anders Pettersson, the exhibition brings together some stunning and remarkable images that highlight the plight of the Amazonian rainforest – and the people living within it (see above).

If you are, yourself, a budding snapper, you’ll be interested to know that WWF and Sky are running a competition in conjunction with the exhibition, to find out what ‘Your own Amazon’ looks like. Get out your iPhone or your fancy camera, step into your own local environment and get photographing. In doing so, you will not only help raise awareness of the Sky Rainforest Rescue and their vital work in tackling deforestation in North-West Brazil, but you could also be in with a chance of winning an SLR camera worth £800. Plus, the chosen winning entry and four runners-up photographs will be selected for exhibition in Somerset House for the final week of the exhibition.

You can submit pictures by Tweeting @SkyBiggerPic and including the hashtag #SkyRainforest. All the images will be collated on the SRR Facebook page and winners will be selected on the 22nd November 2011. For terms and conditions and further info, please visit Sky Rainforest Rescue.

Exhibition details

When? 2 November 2011- 4 December 2011, open daily from 10am to 6pm
Where?
The new East Wing Galleries, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2
Web?
http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/amazon
Wonga?
Free

Halloween in London: 3 top spooky events

23 Oct

Get your ghoul on this weekend with some of the capital’s creepy offerings.

alice cooper at the BFI1. Alice Cooper: Welcome 2 My Nightmare Movies, £13 (concs £9.75 & members get £1.50 off)

On 28th October, this famously theatrical rocker will walk the ‘black carpet’ to the BFI Southbank and discuss the effect that film has had on his song-writing, performances and life. Alice will present chosen a range of film clips to illustrate his talk before putting questions to the audience. The night includes some special guests and freakish performers, and finally a screening of the classic horror film, Halloween.

When: Fri 28 Oct, 6.30pm
Where: NFT1, BFI, Southbank (nearest tube Waterloo)
Web: bfi.org.uk
Box office: 020 7928 3232

 

belle epoque - halloween2. Belle Epoque Party: Halloween Special, £20

Step into a spell-binding world of absinthe-tinged fantasy, daring dancers and vampish drama with the Belle Epoque’s seasonal party this weekend. The music hall venue will be draped in velvet and the organisers encourage costumes as elaborate as you dare… Men should look ‘devilishly dashing’ and ladies, you are asked to ‘reach into your inner desires’. Ooooh. Expect a lavish night of cocktails, enchantment and trapeze artists throwing shapes above you.

When: Sat 29 Oct, 8pm-2am
Where: The Grand Hall, Euston Road, London, WC1
Web: belleepoqueparty.com

 

you make a cake3. You Make A Cake Halloween Parties, £28 each for groups of age 5+, £35 each age 5+ if attending a workshop

Children (and adults) will love these fun workshops and group baking sessions. You Make A Cake provide all ingredients and utensils, so all you need to do is turn up, follow some simples steps, give your kids a major sugar-overload and come away with 12 delicious cakes. Classes and workshops to help you create creepy cakes are currently being run in the build up to Halloween.

Parties for groups last about 90 mins and workshops attended by individuals last for about two hours. Under-8s must be accompanied by an adult.

When: Until Sun 29 Oct
Where: You Make A Cake, 10 Bellevue Road, London, SW17 7EG
Web: youmakeacake.com

Ethical fashion runs riot with colour this London Fashion Week

29 Sep

London Fashion Week can be very exciting – seeing the first collection from a promising new designer, looking through new collections from established designers, going to shows and presentations.  So you can imagine my spirits were high when I tripped along there the first morning, looking forward to the week ahead. However, when I turned into the Courtyard at Somerset House I was met with a sea of fashionistas in black, white, grey, beige and various bland tones in between – barely a splash of colour in sight.

Had I missed some LFW uniform memo? ‘This season, you will mostly be wearing neutral tones. More than one colourful accessory will result in your immediate expulsion from London Fashion Week’. I started to feel a little glum (and somewhat out-of-place my 70s floral frock).

By the time I reached Estethica, the ethical initiative of London Fashion week, I realised I may have somewhat over-reacted and was thrilled to see so many playful designs amongst the SS12 collections. It is always wonderful chatting with the designers who are showcased in Estethica – I never fail to be excited by their innovations, whether that’s through developing genius new ways of up-cycling or in their use of amazing new eco fibres. This season didn’t disappoint and what really stuck out for me were the vibrant colours and sense of humour in so many of the collections. Quite simply, they cheered me up.

Christopher Raeburn once again demonstrates how design excellence can be applied to up-cycling to produce an uber-cool, sustainable and award-winning collection

Henrietta Ludgate’s witty 60s inspired collection utilises eco fabrics and fine tailoring – the resulting garments are designed to last over the generations


From Somewhere continued with their Speedo collaboration for ss12 and what a collection!  Formerly dull swimming costumes re-worked into cute frilly bikinis and cocktail dresses perfect for a pool party.

Also at LFW, but not part of Estethica, were a few brilliant designers whose aesthetic and ethical policies are right up my street.

Esther Porter produces accessories for men and women in London using veg-tanned leather and up-cycled materials such as discarded tents.

Lu flux creates the most colourful, original collections from locally sourced fabrics, often vintage or organic. Her LFW stand always looks magical and never fails to make me smile (and this year was such a nice antidote to all that beige!)

Kate Sheridan believes in using every last scrap and off-cut – this collection features veg tanned leather bags and jewellery imaginatively crafted from leather off-cuts (yep, those beads are made of leather!)


Another showroom which provides a platform for ethical fashion designers is Ecoluxe. Though relatively new and not officially connected to London Fashion Week, Ecoluxe takes place at the same time so the designers it showcases are exposed to as many press and buyers as possible.  I had so much fun playing with and photographing some of the designs but here’s an edited selection…

Plastic Seconds turns plastic waste into the most eye-catching accessories. A favourite of mine is the necklace fashioned from the little fish-shaped soy sauce bottles that come with sushi.

Inala’s ingenious designs are multi-functional – this jumpsuit can be worn at least four ways and is the perfect garment for anyone wishing to pack light. What’s more, the whole collection is made from eco-friendly fibre Tencel.

Bailey Tomlin’s accessories are truly exquisite (I don’t use that word often but it really does apply here). I feel in love with this gorgeous pea pod head-piece – what luck that it matched my vintage jacket perfectly!


The Little Big Peace Event

16 Sep

PeaceA dollop of world peace and culture comes to South London

This brand new little festival aims to promote world peace – from Streatham outwards. Set up and run entirely by volunteers, the event is open to everyone and includes various activities from meditation to movies. The founder, Mel Larson, says: “The little big peace event sets out to explore the culture and concept of peace in a fun, friendly and open-minded atmosphere. The event aims to draw in the local community, both as participants and event-goers. At its heart is the idea of inclusiveness and acceptance. This is peace in its widest sense – not just political but personal too”

We at EggMag think it’s going to be pretty special. Here’s our pick of events:

The-Day-After-PeaceFREE SCREENING OF THE DAY AFTER PEACE
An actor-packed, award-winning documentary film by Jeremy Gilley, outlining his efforts to create an annual day of global ceasefire and peace. Featuring Jude Law, Annie Lennox, Angelina Jolie, The Dalai Lama to name a few, we see Gilley struggle against cynics and financial blows, but will he ultimately succeed in his quest?
Monday 19 September, 6pm at the Streatham Odeon

PEACE MEANS PRIZES AND LIVE MUSIC
Try your luck at winning a nice selection of goodies (including an EggMag bag of fun) at this pub quiz. Stick around for some live music by Tara Brown, Sonja Byrne, Great Gustos, Lianne La Havas and Rún – and for a spot of performance art and poetry. Taking place on Wednesday 21 September at 6pm at The White Lion.

CULTIVATION DAY
Get back to nature and de-stress with some gardening on Streatham Common. Meet the community garden team and other green-fingered types while you prepare the site for planting.
Sunday 25 September, Time TBA

For more information, visit the website.

Pure fashion

24 Aug

Zoe Robinson finds ethical fashion is really kicking off at Pure

Earlier this month I spent a day in the bizarre bubble that is London’s Olympia to visit the fashion trade show Pure.  This bi-annual event takes place for buyers and press to have a good old gander at what designers have created for us all for Spring / Summer 2012.

Over the last few seasons the ethical offering at Pure has grown, largely thanks to the Ethical Fashion Forum (EFF), ‘the industry body dedicated to a sustainable future for fashion’, who also runs seminars at the show.  Primarily geared towards buyers, their must-see seminars focus on how to put together a great ethical fashion collection in store, and with sales of eco clothing having grown by 72% in 2010, retailers really have an incentive (and in my opinion a responsibility) to source their stock ethically.

At Pure, EFF also present the winners of the EFF Innovation Award which recognises excellence in design, quality of product and ethical credentials.  Here are just some of my favourites from this season’s Pure, starting with one of the Innovation winners Chichia…

This exciting new collaboration between Made By Africa and Chichia is produced in a fair-trade certified factory in Tanzania. The colourful and highly wearable designs combine jersey with African prints in organic cotton (see above).

Nancy Dee now produce their entire collection in the UK using eco friendly fabrics suchs as organic cotton and bamboo. In addition to their wonderful and much-loved printed jersey dresses (above), they have some great tailored pieces for SS12.

If you are a regular reader of EggMag you’ll know we do love London-based brand Lowie so I was very excited to see this 50s style dress (above) in a cute boat print – the first print they have had designed exclusively for them.

This image doesn’t do justice to this ultra feminine dress by Komodo (above) – it’s a  really beautiful print and such a versatile style.

There is so much to like about this sublimely simple, versatile and very soft organic cotton dress (above) from Stewart+Brown. How can I style thee? Oh let me count the ways…

It was great to discover this very exciting new Colombian brand Cyclus at Pure. Crafted from highly durable inner tubes these these bags are a triumph of expert design, upcycling and local production. Loathed as I am to recommend a new ‘it’ bag – or utter the words ‘must buy’ – but if you invest in one hot new accessorise brand next season, let it be this one!

I have my eye on this new style from Makki (above) which would go with just about anything. Made from eel skins that are a by-product of the food industry it’s sustainable and stylish, just what we like.

Beautifully feminine bag from Coco Barclay (above) – the vintage gloves can be removed for a more casual look and if it’s cold outside they will keep your fingers cosy.

The brilliant Beyond Skin are a vegan brand who make efforts to be as sustainable as possible. Some of these stunning (and surprisingly comfortable) shoes are produced using a super soft fabric made from recycled plastic (see above).

Meher Kakalia’s amazing footwear and bags are produced in Karachi often using ‘found’ materials (some weaving embellishments are done with thin strips or ‘threads’ of plastic bags), utilising tradtitional techniques and supporting local, highly-skilled artisans. I love them so much I took extra photos, which are below for your shoe-ogling pleasure.


See Zoe’s website www.think-style.co.uk
Twitter @zoerobinson1
Facebook Think Style

Vintage at Southbank

4 Aug

What a brilliant, inspirational festival this is.

The Vintage Festival celebrates everything from the forties to the eighties, from live music to old films, art to fashion. It takes the best of each of these decades and looks to the year ahead with the suggestion of a ‘future vintage’. Genius.

Check out some of our snaps below and make sure you sign up to their mailing list so you can get the heads up for tickets next year: vintage website

The Vintage Issue on show on the Plastic Seconds stand

The Vintage Issue on show on the Plastic Seconds stand

Vintage Radios

Vintage Radios

The 60s Lounge

The 60s Lounge

The 80s Rave

The 80s Rave

Vintage People

Vintage People

Wall coverings at the Bad Art Bar

Wall coverings at the Bad Art Bar

Zoe Robinson

Fashion editor Zoe Robinson in THAT dress

Beach Hut on Southbank

Beach Hut on Southbank

Make do and me-time (…and save the world a little bit)

28 Jul
The Make Lounge

The Make Lounge

Oh, switch it off. ‘What? Never!’ I hear you cry. But recently I discovered that we all should. And frequently. As we all know, in this age of 3G, cloud-computing and Twitter feeds, it’s hard to remember to take a break from all the i-noise (she says as she types her blog).

I heard on Radio 4 the other day about a new scheme where depression sufferers are recovering through learning how to garden. The nurturing aspect of this past-time gives them great personal reward: it forces them into a new surrounding – and to switch off from their normal routine.

Ok, so I know our addiction to net noise isn’t the same as depression, but the key point is that escaping a routine can be good soul food. Too long without that break can leave us feeling frazzled, tired or wired. It’s to those of you nodding in agreement (and to those of you who just like crafty shit) that I am speaking.

Our e-escape lies, rather excitingly, in a bunch of inanimate objects, just waiting – like dirty buried truffles – to be turned into something beautiful. And by your fair hands, no less. I found total and unexpected relief, recently, in making beaded necklaces with my niece. The careful formulation of colour patterns and shapes became stupidly mesmeric and busied us for the best part of two hours, which flew by like seconds. As we beaded, the stress of my Getting Stuff Done Yesterday working day evaporated and I totally forgot that I hadn’t refreshed Twitter in more than ten minutes. (Gasp).

So, there it is. Craft is therapy. And luckily for us there are plenty of workshops  popping up to prove this point. The Papered Parlour in Clapham put on various workshops from dressmaking to printing your own wallpaper and The Make Lounge in Islington have a wonderful, broad range of classes such as creative cross stitch, making festive fascinators and ‘knockout’ knickers. If you’re down Brighton way, Sew in Brighton teach how to sew, design, mend and alter your own clothes.

If you don’t fancy taking a class, get inspiration at home from Indie Craft by Jo Waterhouse, a sweet book that showcases the work of a band of inventive handy-folk, who make everything from crocheted fried breakfasts to knitted graffiti.

Someone who truly understands this form of escapism – and gets even more out of it than just that – is John-Paul Flintoff. (Yes, a man). In the welcome note to his book, Sew Your Own, he says: ‘I never intended to go searching for the meaning of life – far less to find it in making my clothes. But one thing led to another and it gradually dawned on me that the best way to save cash, reduce emissions, and take control from ‘the system’ would be to modify a shirt, then make a pair of jeans, and eventually to harvest nettles, spin the fibres and knit myself a pair of Y-fonts.’

So, what are you waiting for? Switch off, make some ‘you time’, and save the world while you’re at it.